Taxes, more taxes, and … “recreational” marijuana

With the ink barely dry on Oregon’s costly Low Carbon Fuel Standard law, Portland city commissioner Steve Novick bets than a 10-cents-a-gallon gas tax will be his ticket to re-election. Along the way, Ann asks the question: What if we can say how our tax dollars are spent?

We wrap with the one “sin” that’s not subject to a “sin tax.” That’s right, “recreational” marijuana in Oregon is not taxed. Who will be the first politician to come out of the ganja closet?

Here’s how you can hear more:

  • Listen on Podbean, the podcasting platform.
  • The podcast is now available on iTunes. Please subscribe to make the most of your weekly Econ Minute.

For blogging on the Portland City Council scene, check out TuesdayMemo.

For a minute or so of economics, read the EconMinute blog.

TuesdayMemo/EconMinute podcast: Win-win

“Win-win” is the topic for this week’s podcast because it’s “game on” for Portland’s election season.

  • Oregon state treasurer Ted Wheeler enters the Portland mayor’s race, facing off against incumbent Charlie Hales. The candidates are virtual twins: both are former Republicans turned Democrats, each trying the show that he is the most serious progressive candidate (or the most progressive serious candidate). What is the one issue on which they differ?
  • A majority of city council is up for grabs. Where are all the candidates? Where are Portland’s Trumps and Sanders?
  • Mayor Hales has a plan to make housing more affordable … by making it more expensive.
  • Trees, trees, and more trees. If you thought bikes were a source of city strife, try cutting down some 100 year old trees.

Here’s how you can hear more:

  • Listen on Podbean, the podcasting platform.
  • The podcast is now available on iTunes. Please subscribe to make the most of your weekly Econ Minute.

For blogging on the Portland City Council scene, check out TuesdayMemo.

For a minute or so of economics, read the EconMinute blog.

TuesdayMemo and EconMinute team up for a very Portland podcast

TuesdayMemo and EconMinute team up for a very Portland podcast. We bring together politics, economics, and a dose of common sense into the conversation about what’s happening in Oregon’s biggest city.

This episode, for the first week of August 2015, covers a wide range of topics:

  • Greenpeace vs. Flugtag: The contrast between how officials treat protestors illegally blocking the Willamette River and how they treat those who jump through the hoops to get a permit. For a bonus, we learn what Portland Mayor Charlie Hales was doing while river was shut down.
  • Then we talk about the mayor’s friends in high places. And some of the friends of City Hall.
    Q: How do you know that Charlie Hales has met the Pope or President?
    A: He won’t stop talking about it.
  • We end with a chat about “Ban the Box.” What’s Ban the Box? Listen and find out!

Here’s how you can hear more:

  • Listen on Podbean, the podcasting platform.
  • The podcast is now available on iTunes. Please subscribe to make the most of your weekly Econ Minute.

For blogging on the Portland City Council scene, check out TuesdayMemo.

For a minute or so of economics, read the EconMinute blog.

Oregon’s low carbon fuel standard: Messy policy, bad economics

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The extension of Oregon’s low carbon fuel standard (LCFS) was crammed through in the early days of the 2015 legislative session.

Supporters of the low carbon fuel standard hope that Oregon can free ride off infrastructure already in place in California and British Columbia to reduce the impact at the pump.

Reality is less hopeful: Every aspect of Oregon life will be affected by higher fuel prices that will do nothing to slow, stop, or reverse global warming or climate change.

Even worse, even experts who have spent years studying the low carbon fuel standard have no idea how suppliers and consumers will respond to the LCFS, leading to years of uncertainty.

This is presentation to the Oregon Fuels Association annual meeting in Sunriver, Oregon on July 20, 2015.

Podcast – Hillary Clinton, jobs, Big Bird, and trolls all in one short podcast!

Big issues in this week’s Econ Minute Podcast:

  • Hillary Clinton gets it wrong on the economy jobs connection.
  • Don’t blame Baby Boomers for the shrinking labor force.
  • Does Big Bird make kids smarter? Does Spongebob make them stupid? Some lessons in pop culture and pop science.
  • Are all Internet trolls bad? Can they be a force for good?

All these topics are covered on one short podcast.

The podcast is now available on iTunes. Please subscribe to make the most of your weekly Econ Minute.

Podcast – The worst solution to homelessness, Millennials and their parents, and a taste of Chinese wines

 

 

This week’s Econ Minute Podcast spans the globe and crosses generations.

First we have what may be the one of the worst solutions to urban homelessness. Cities across the globe go to great lengths to get their homeless population out from under bridges and away from railroad tracks. Progressive Portland turns that goal on it’s head. The city’s mayor is finalizing a deal to purchase some land under a under a bridge and only few feet away from an active railway line. His goal: Move some of downtown Portland’s homeless population to a place where they are out of sight and out of mind.

Next we follow up on our look at millennials and see how their parents are changing TV programming.

We end with a story of a bold prediction that came true regarding China’s burgeoning wine business.

The podcast is now available on iTunes. Please subscribe to make the most of your weekly Econ Minute.

Podcast – Millennials, affordable housing, and taxing star scientists

 

What are Millennials and what do they want?

Econ Minute answers that with a clip from Matt Edlen‘s presentation at the Portland State Center for Real Estate Annual Conference. Get inside the minds of the mysterious Millennials and learn how they and their parents will change the world.

Next, we spend a few minutes on affordable housing and look at how it’s a problem worsened by policy.

We end with a look at income taxes and the role they play in attracting scientists to a state … or driving them out.

Podcast – Gridlock, Painkiller Abuse, Jobs, and Free Speech

This week’s podcast looks at how gridlock could be good for state budgets and economic growth.

Then we’ll check out new research suggesting that Medicare’s expansion in to prescription drug benefits has caused a boom in painkiller abuse.

On the job front, we’ll examine new evidence that referral based hiring is better for business and better for workers than the traditional methods of sifting through stacks of resumes and applications.

We’ll wrap thing up with commentary on two very different views of how free speech works in a world of free markets.

First podcast – Subsidies, smokes, and solar

Welcome to the Econ Minute. It’s more than a minute, and it’s about more than just economics.

This is our first podcast. This pilot podcast begins with a visit to a mixed up world where the homeless are arrested for stealing less than a penny’s worth of electricity while high end electric vehicle drivers get priority parking and the privilege of plugging in for free.

Next, we take a trip in the wacky world of healthcare where expanded Medicaid coverage may lead to increased smoking by pregnant mothers-to-be.

We end with the silly world of solar energy where you might find some of the lowest of low wage workers. And these workers really are trapped in their jobs.

For more information or to hire an economist to speak at your next event or provide expert testimony, please visit www.econinternational.com.