Signs are pointing to strong growth for the U.S. economy and that’s a big deal

Global growth will pick up faster than previously expected in the coming months as the Trump administration’s planned tax cuts and public spending fire up the U.S. economy, the OECD recently announced, revising its forecast upward from earlier this year.

In its most recent Economic Outlook, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development projected the U.S. economy would grow by 2.3 percent in 2017 and to 3 percent in 2018. Global growth is expected to accelerate from 2.9 percent this year to 3.3 percent in 2017 and reach 3.6 percent in 2018.

Markets have shown some early confidence that the economy will improve with the new administration. The Dow Jones Industrial Average is up almost 5 percent since election day and the S&P 500 is up more than 3 percent. Consumers seem to be sharing the confidence with early reports of strong retail sales for Black Friday and Cyber Monday.

During his campaign, Mr. Trump pledged to boost infrastructure spending by as much as $1 trillion, although the details of how that would be financed are sketchy. He has also promised to cut corporate and personal income taxes. In addition, changes to employment regulations and the Affordable Care Act are expected to spur hiring by businesses and bring more Americans into full time employment.

Costly and onerous overtime rules imposed by the Obama administration have been blocked by a federal judge and are likely to be overturned during the Trump administration. Changes to the ACA are expected to jettison mandates triggered by having more than 50 employees or by working more than 29 hours a week. Be prepared for more people working more hours.

Financial reforms are on the way with an expected overhaul of Dodd-Frank. House Finance Committee Chairman Jeb Hensarling and others in Congress have laid out the key principles they say will guide financial reforms: restoring rule of law to the regulatory process and allowing banks to regain control of their own lending and other business decisions so long as they are credibly taking risks with their own funds rather than relying on the protection of taxpayers. This may be the end of “Too Big to Fail.”

Rising interest rates will strengthen bank profits and provide a tailwind to encourage more lending while also slowing the growth in housing prices.

Does growth really matter? Yes, it’s a big deal

When economists talk about growth, they are trying to get a handle of how much better (or worse) off are we versus a year ago. Are we getting richer or poorer or just standing still? When we talk about growth, we talk about year-over-year percentage growth rates. But, what is a “good” growth rate?

Here’s some perspective, looking back in time.

Average incomes doubled from the bottom of the Great Depression in 1933 to the middle of the post-war boom of 1950—a space of just 17 years. Over that period, incomes grew an average of 4 percent a year. Incomes doubled in less than one generation.

It took another 27 years afterward (1950 to 1977) for incomes to double. The people watching the TV show Happy Days were twice as rich as the people portrayed in the show. That amounts to an average annual growth rate of 2.5 percent a year.

Then, after that, it took another 38 years (1977 to 2015) for incomes to double. Over that period of time, average incomes grew by 1.8 percent a year. It took almost two generations for incomes to double.

A difference of 1.5 percentage points in the growth is the difference between doubling incomes every generation or doubling every other generation.

Think of it this way. Since 2010, GDP growth has been about 2.2 percent a year. At that rate, it would take more than 30 years for incomes to double. If that growth can be boosted to 3 percent a year, incomes would double eight years faster. That’s a big deal. That’s one reason stock prices rise on even modest upward revisions to GDP forecasts.

Look on the flip side, regulations and taxes that stifle growth—even if by less than one percent—can have serious long run effects on our standard of living. When a politician says, “Well it’s just half a percentage point off the growth rate,” you should answer, “Well that’s another five to ten years we lose in income growth.” That’s a big deal.

So, let’s get out there and grow this economy. Your kids and grandkids will thank you for it.